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2012: The year in cartoons

A retrospective of the year that was, from Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Tony Auth:

It’s always a revelation to go through a year’s work. This year I was surprised by how many drawings I’d done on gun violence.

The year was also dominated by the election, of course. And, in retrospect, looking at the cartoons done during the surreal Republican primaries, the final result seems so fore-ordained — though it didn’t seem so at the time.

See more from Tony in his blog Behind the Lines.

A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money

From NPR: Explore political ad spending through creative cartography. This animated map shows where superPACs and other outside groups spent their money — over a six-month period during the general election — to air political ads aimed at influencing the presidential race.

What do you think of this platform?

• kill mortgage tax deduction, corporate health insurance deduction, and corporate income taxes

• shift from income to consumption tax

• tax carbon emissions

• legalize marijuana.

wnyc:

Would you vote for this man? Our pals at Planet Money got a bunch of economists together and picked six bi-partisan economic reforms that everyone (at least, economists) can agree on. Listen to Robert Smith on the Brian Lehrer Show here.

Plus, Robert Smith gave the WNYC crowd to come up with a name for this fake candidate. So, what would you call him?

Politics — occasionally a laughing matter

Can Pennsylvania political candidates survive for two minutes of stand up comedy?

You be the judge.

For the 22nd year running, Philadelphia Daily News columnist Stu Bykofsky invited local candidates for elected office to get on stage to deliver two minutes of stand-up comedy to benefit Variety, a children’s charity.

Maybe I’m not the best judge. I can’t say they’re slayin’ ‘em in the aisles, but it feels like they’re killing me.

As Dave Davies says, usually politicians are more funny when they’re not trying so hard.

I realized that there is a part of covering Congress—if you’re doing daily coverage—that is actually sort of colluding with the politicians themselves, because so much of what I was doing was actually recording and playing what they say or repeating what they say. And I feel like the real story of Congress right now is very much removed from any of that, from the sort of theater of the policy debate in Congress, and it has become such a complete theater that none of it is real

I feel like I am, as a reporter in the Capitol, lied to every day, all day. There is so little genuine discussion going on with the reporters… To me, as a reporter, everything is spin.

I am going to try to focus myself on the stories that none of the other reporters have time to cover. NPR would have loved to have had any of these stories… The problem is, as a modern, esteemed news organization, NPR also feels that it needs to cover the daily news. And the daily news as currently defined is what happened on the floor today, what’s the big debate in Congress, what’s your government doing. And I completely understand that. But our staff is so small on the Hill that it was impossible for me to do more than a story once in a while that agreed with how I felt it should be covered.

Andrea Seabrook, former weekend host of All Things Considered, on why she left NPR to start DecodeDC, a blog and podcast about Washington politics. Politico, Ex-NPR Hill reporter: Lied to daily

Bonus: Seabrook talks with NPR’s Jennifer Ludden in this July interview about her departure and thoughts on Washington political culture.

Double Bonus: Seabrook is one of 15 Soundcloud Community 2012 fellows. Head over to hear some of the audio stories that each is producing.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Ryan visits Pa. to blast Obama on jobs, economy

The Republican candidate for vice president came to West Chester, Pa., to take aim at the Obama-Biden record.

Congressman Paul Ryan says President Barack Obama gave lawmakers from places such as Pennsylvania a no-win choice when it came to the federal budget — they were faced with either cutting defense spending or raising the burden on small business.

Several thousand supporters were at the American Helicopter Museum Tuesday to hear Ryan’s message on behalf of Mitt Romney and the Republican ticket for the White House. One woman fainted in the heat waiting to hear Ryan speak. 

Outside the event, U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey presided at a rally of about 50 Obama supporters. Democrats contend a Romney-Ryan administration would hurt seniors.

For a time this afternoon, a small plane dragging the message “ROMNEY, RYAN, AKIN = WRONG 4 WOMEN” circled the airfield where Ryan spoke.

(Illustration by Tony Auth)
With the selection of Paul Ryan as his running mate, political cartoonist Tony Auth thinks Romney is trying to entice Americans to vote for an all-out assault on what remains of the middle class: More tax cuts for the wealthiest among us and savage cuts in the social programs the rest of us depend on.

(Illustration by Tony Auth)

With the selection of Paul Ryan as his running mate, political cartoonist Tony Auth thinks Romney is trying to entice Americans to vote for an all-out assault on what remains of the middle class: More tax cuts for the wealthiest among us and savage cuts in the social programs the rest of us depend on.

(Illustration by Tony Auth)
Does the upholding of Pennsylvania’s voter ID law mean the GOP will get to crack the whip on Nov. 6?

(Illustration by Tony Auth)

Does the upholding of Pennsylvania’s voter ID law mean the GOP will get to crack the whip on Nov. 6?

The Supreme Court not only refused to revisit its disastrous Citizens United decision on Monday, it didn’t even deign to consider arguments. The 2010 ruling allows corporations to make unlimited campaign contributions and has led to the rise of super PACs.
The Court’s conservative majority, supposedly devoted to states’ rights, refused to permit Montana, or any other state, to impose limits on spending by corporations on elections. Montana was not even allowed to make the case that such unlimited, and often secret, spending leads to corruption.

The Supreme Court not only refused to revisit its disastrous Citizens United decision on Monday, it didn’t even deign to consider arguments. The 2010 ruling allows corporations to make unlimited campaign contributions and has led to the rise of super PACs.

The Court’s conservative majority, supposedly devoted to states’ rights, refused to permit Montana, or any other state, to impose limits on spending by corporations on elections. Montana was not even allowed to make the case that such unlimited, and often secret, spending leads to corruption.

We hear the term “shared sacrifice” thrown out a lot these days by politicians and pundits. While it seems to denote everyone should give a little to help make things better for everyone, in New Jersey the only ones that seem to do the sharing are the middle and working class.
—Rob Tornoe

We hear the term “shared sacrifice” thrown out a lot these days by politicians and pundits. While it seems to denote everyone should give a little to help make things better for everyone, in New Jersey the only ones that seem to do the sharing are the middle and working class.

—Rob Tornoe