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2012: The year in cartoons

A retrospective of the year that was, from Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Tony Auth:

It’s always a revelation to go through a year’s work. This year I was surprised by how many drawings I’d done on gun violence.

The year was also dominated by the election, of course. And, in retrospect, looking at the cartoons done during the surreal Republican primaries, the final result seems so fore-ordained — though it didn’t seem so at the time.

See more from Tony in his blog Behind the Lines.

Zeitgeist 2012: Year In Review (by Google)

OK. So it’s an ad for Google. Let’s make no mistake about that.

It’s also fun to look back at the last year. As with any year, 2012 brought us countless things worth remembering. The accumulation of human experience keeps moving us forward. Here’s hoping there are enough servers to store it all.

We are getting the election we need
With the election weeks away, we will soon see more examples of that old chestnut of pre-election opinion columns, the one that attacks both major parties for “not focusing on the long-term problems that afflict our country.” We are not at a loss for long-term problems, but at the top of every pundit’s list is the trillion-dollar budget deficit and the partisan divide that makes it impossible for us to reach the compromise we need to eliminate it.
The “plague on both parties” column serves many purposes. It enables opinion writers to keep up the façade or, in some cases, the reality of non-partisanship. It reinforces their claim to be deep, far-sighted thinkers. And, of course, it doesn’t anger the advertisers.
Sometimes those centrist columns actually tell the truth about our politics. But in 2012 we are getting exactly the election contest we need, one that is focused on the most important issues of the day: whether our government is act on behalf of the corporate elite or working people and the middle class.

We are getting the election we need

With the election weeks away, we will soon see more examples of that old chestnut of pre-election opinion columns, the one that attacks both major parties for “not focusing on the long-term problems that afflict our country.” We are not at a loss for long-term problems, but at the top of every pundit’s list is the trillion-dollar budget deficit and the partisan divide that makes it impossible for us to reach the compromise we need to eliminate it.

The “plague on both parties” column serves many purposes. It enables opinion writers to keep up the façade or, in some cases, the reality of non-partisanship. It reinforces their claim to be deep, far-sighted thinkers. And, of course, it doesn’t anger the advertisers.

Sometimes those centrist columns actually tell the truth about our politics. But in 2012 we are getting exactly the election contest we need, one that is focused on the most important issues of the day: whether our government is act on behalf of the corporate elite or working people and the middle class.