NewsWorks: Stuff We Like
Hand-Drawn Floor Plans of Popular TV Show Apartments and Houses
Iñaki Aliste Lizarralde, a Spanish interior designer, has hand-drawn a series of floor plans for popular television character residences.
Can you guess whose house this is?

Hand-Drawn Floor Plans of Popular TV Show Apartments and Houses

Iñaki Aliste Lizarralde, a Spanish interior designer, has hand-drawn a series of floor plans for popular television character residences.

Can you guess whose house this is?

Famed architect Furness also fascinated with the human facade

The Athenaeum of Philadelphia is the repository of working drawings by the great 19th-century architect Frank Furness.

Currently it has something more whimsical on exhibition. Bulging eyes. Prolonged noses. Mouths twisted in grotesque grimaces.

"He had a great way of looking at your face and finding the couple distinctive features about your cheeks, forehead, or nose, and stretching them to the point where you are recognizable but making you look — frankly — ghastly," said Michael Lewis, a professor of art history at Williams College.

Lewis curated “Face and Form: The Art and Caricature of Frank Furness,” a selection of drawings from Furness’ personal sketchbooks, most of which are privately held by his descendants and have never been seen publicly.

Throughout his long career as an architect, Furness constantly drew funny faces for his own amusement, often at the expense of friends, clients, and relatives who were the subjects of the drawings. The quick but deftly accomplished illustrations hang beside examples of his architectural work to show that an exaggerated chin and comically sloped forehead are echoed in the bold, expressive elements of his buildings.

More

Respected Philadelphia architect Robert Venturi has retired from Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, Inc., and his firm has become VSBA, LLC. Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, Inc., was responsible for many prominent buildings in Philadelphia, including Lenfest Hall at the Curtis Institute. In April a PBS documentary crew visited the house.

Amy Smith and her daughter, Ruby Kaufmann, in front of their home, inspired by Buckminster Fuller. (Photos courtesy of Amy Smith)

Amy Smith is a dancer and choreographer with the Headlong Dance Company. In 2004, when she proposed to her husband that they build a geodesic dome, it was a joke.

"I really associate domes with hippies," said the mother of two. "I think of it as something that really crunchy, granola people in California would consider doing. But we really tried to work against that aesthetic by using midcentury modern furniture — you know, a cleaner aesthetic than what you traditionally see in a dome."

MORE